What inspired you to create your proposal? 

During our very first semester in masters, we had to extensively research Orkney – the place, people and culture. Along the work we were doing we had the opportunity to visit Orkney and meet some of the locals. I can not remember whether it was on the trip or in school that I heard the story about an Old lady who was knitting jumpers and her grandchild was helping her sell them online. Another story was about a young woman who was involved in crafts and was also using the internet to sustain her business. This gave me an insight on how important arts and crafts on the island are. During summer when the big boats come, these small businesses create a large and prosperous market. Nevertheless, I believe it is hard to sustain in on a small island considering all the limitations that are in place. The Orkadian Cultural Heritage Centre provides a shelter for all artist and craftsmen who are in need of specialised materials, equipment, workspace or just the opportunity to mingle and talk with enthusiasts alike.  

 

What is your best memory of the M.Arch course?  

Thera are many moments that I’ve shared with my friends and colleagues over the length of the course. One of the truly joyful and fun ones was during the same semester when fellow colleague Dobromir and I were charged with the task of constructing tables for our exhibition. The true challenge was not in the design of the pieces themselves, but more so in the use of offcuts and leftover materials to produce a high-quality exhibition element.  

 

What is your architectural philosophy? 

My architectural philosophy follows the principles of realism and adoption of technology. For me each project has to be designed in regards with its surroundings and showing respect to the historical environment. A maximum amount of computer assistance can provide the necessary simulations to ensure adequate environmental qualities are achieved. Buildings have to be practical, comfortable and healthy. 

 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

I remember as a child growing up in a faraway neighbourhood – the border of the city in fact. Next to my block of flats there were woods and fields. There were always big crowds of kids playing outside in the summer. We used to build tree houses and forts all day long, constantly changing, expanding and improving. Later on I went into construction school and worked in the field for several years. Having witnessed how the whole environments exists, what technologies and principles are adopted, I felt I can do more and contribute for the development of my community. The desire for alternative viewpoints, newer technologies and an overall different life experience inspired me to pursue architectural education in a foreign country.

 

Where do you see yourself in five years time?

In five years’ time I hope to be fully qualified and working In Bulgaria. I want to have the opportunity use the knowledge I’ve gained over the pass 6 years and be part of a new movement that will improve the overall architectural practice in the country and the way its been portrayed. 

 

Who inspired you to become an architect?

During the time I was working in construction I was already determined I wanted to study architecture. Several months before I came to Scotland I was working as an intern for an architect in my hometown. Before I joined his team, I was quite unaware of how the whole design process takes place. Moreover, I had never heard of names such as Mies, Corb or Gropius, however in his tales I found a different perspective – one of historic value and technological advance. His name is Valeri Kolev.  

Krasmir Banchev

Unit Two

2020

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What inspired you to create your proposal?

Although my proposal was driven by a personal interest in, and experience of, craft beer and brewing, a visit to Swannay Brewery in the summer of 2019 confirmed my decision to design an experiential brewery within the context of Stromness.

Only after visiting their expanding facility, meeting with their founder Rob Hill, did I truly get excited about developing my proposal and exploring the design possibilities.

 

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The technical design of my project was the most challenging as it required in-depth understanding of the brewing process and subsequent logistics to ensure the proposal was fully developed inline with the facility’s specific requirements.

Although it was more challenging, the exploration of the Brewery’s technical design was the most rewarding aspect of the project. By developing a comprehensive understanding of brewery operation, the fundamentals of each step in its process, and the conditions under which each takes place, I was able to develop a design which minimised the energy consumption of the facility significantly.

 

The research undertaken and the principles employed within the project have subsequently presented a research opportunity within the university to work alongside local breweries to put the principals into practice. An extremely rewarding outcome to come from a challenging investigation.

 

 

What is your best memory of the M.Arch course?

Undoubtedly, being part of the Fifty-Seven Ten Architecture Society committee (2018/19).

 

We were fortunate enough to welcome an incredible group of architects and artists to the Scott Sutherland School to deliver talks on their work as part of our thirty-year anniversary lecture series.

 

It was incredibly rewarding being part of such a hard working team which put together an impressive run of events. It was a privilege to meet and learn from an extensive range of visiting professionals.

Karla Duncan

Unit Two

2020

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What inspired you to create your proposal? 

During our very first semester in masters, we had to extensively research Orkney – the place, people and culture. Along the work we were doing we had the opportunity to visit Orkney and meet some of the locals. I can not remember whether it was on the trip or in school that I heard the story about an Old lady who was knitting jumpers and her grandchild was helping her sell them online. Another story was about a young woman who was involved in crafts and was also using the internet to sustain her business. This gave me an insight on how important arts and crafts on the island are. During summer when the big boats come, these small businesses create a large and prosperous market. Nevertheless, I believe it is hard to sustain in on a small island considering all the limitations that are in place. The Orkadian Cultural Heritage Centre provides a shelter for all artist and craftsmen who are in need of specialised materials, equipment, workspace or just the opportunity to mingle and talk with enthusiasts alike.  

 

What is your best memory of the M.Arch course?  

Thera are many moments that I’ve shared with my friends and colleagues over the length of the course. One of the truly joyful and fun ones was during the same semester when fellow colleague Dobromir and I were charged with the task of constructing tables for our exhibition. The true challenge was not in the design of the pieces themselves, but more so in the use of offcuts and leftover materials to produce a high-quality exhibition element.  

 

What is your architectural philosophy? 

My architectural philosophy follows the principles of realism and adoption of technology. For me each project has to be designed in regards with its surroundings and showing respect to the historical environment. A maximum amount of computer assistance can provide the necessary simulations to ensure adequate environmental qualities are achieved. Buildings have to be practical, comfortable and healthy. 

 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

I remember as a child growing up in a faraway neighbourhood – the border of the city in fact. Next to my block of flats there were woods and fields. There were always big crowds of kids playing outside in the summer. We used to build tree houses and forts all day long, constantly changing, expanding and improving. Later on I went into construction school and worked in the field for several years. Having witnessed how the whole environments exists, what technologies and principles are adopted, I felt I can do more and contribute for the development of my community. The desire for alternative viewpoints, newer technologies and an overall different life experience inspired me to pursue architectural education in a foreign country.

 

Where do you see yourself in five years time?

In five years’ time I hope to be fully qualified and working In Bulgaria. I want to have the opportunity use the knowledge I’ve gained over the pass 6 years and be part of a new movement that will improve the overall architectural practice in the country and the way its been portrayed. 

 

Who inspired you to become an architect?

During the time I was working in construction I was already determined I wanted to study architecture. Several months before I came to Scotland I was working as an intern for an architect in my hometown. Before I joined his team, I was quite unaware of how the whole design process takes place. Moreover, I had never heard of names such as Mies, Corb or Gropius, however in his tales I found a different perspective – one of historic value and technological advance. His name is Valeri Kolev.  

Krasmir Banchev

Unit Two

2020

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