What inspired you to create your proposal? 

The projects from Unit 2 were all focused on the Orkney Islands, an archipelago recognised as a global leader within the sustainable energy industry. Since 2003 it is believed that they have generated over 100% of the island’s electricity demand from renewable sources. Our Unit aim was to create a feasible model for communities of the future using Orkney as an exemplar; a model which could be replicated in any rural community. The key objectives looked to encourage economic growth for the island, caring for the elderly population and tackling climate change.

 

In keeping with this I felt that the island would benefit from a Research and Design Centre for Electric Vehicles. This R&D centre looks to generate new job opportunities to attract people to the island, consequently boosting the island's economy and placing Orkney at the forefront of the design of zero emission vehicles. The location in Stromness is remote away from prying eyes, which is perfect for car manufactures as they look to test new vehicles on the onsite test track. 

 

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

My best memories always surround the yearly study trips, although my favourite would have to be when we spent the day cycling around Barcelona in the sunshine visiting all of the architectural landmarks and stopping off once or twice for “uno cerveza por favor”. The study trips were great as they allowed us to look at the very best of international design first hand; from historic treasures to modern structures, often inspiring our future projects in terms of architectural design, structures, construction, environmental design and the history and theory of architectural design.

 

What is your architectural philosophy? 

In light of current events I believe it is important to learn from the economic downturn created by Covid-19 and treat the current pandemic as a catalyst for change within the built environment. It is important that as designers of the built environment we are aware of the opportunities we have to impact mental health and human behaviour in a positive way. Through design we can encourage people to be more active and allow people more control over their own space. 

 

However it is also important that we take the time to address the difficult questions that society faces today and make innovative propositions to tackle these. It is in this way that I believe we must find new solutions to tackle climate change. The built environment currently makes up 40% of the UK’s carbon footprint and this must change. As the next generation of young architects I believe we should be looking to experiment. We need to find an alternative to the top down Victorian construction method currently in use which imposes structure upon matter, and experiment with SynBioDesign or “living architecture”. Although living architecture removes the aesthetic control over the finer details of construction which architects love, I believe it creates a strong proposition for a sustainable future of the built environment, as quoted by Ingber below: 

 

“One can envision a future in which buildings are designed to sense environmental cues and adapt their shape and function to continuously optimize energy efficiency, light transmission, thermal gain, and other behaviours critical for sustainability”  by Donald E Ingber.

 

Why did you choose to study architecture? 

I chose to study architecture as I have always had a passion for creating, be that drawing, painting, sewing, baking - anything which meant I could get a bit messy! However I also really enjoy the mathematical aspects to designing which force you to think outside of the box for solutions. I really love the idea that you can significantly change the happiness of a person’s day to day life through architecture, from proportions, to materials, to room layouts, all of which can have an influence on someone’s mood. It was because of all of these factors combined that I decide to study architecture and 6 years on I am very glad I did.

 

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time? 

In five years’ time I see myself as a successful Architect having achieved my RIBA Part 3 qualification. I will continue to learn new skills that will benefit both the practice I work for and the clients, whilst too helping me achieve my own career goals. I am eager to experience new challenges and visit new countries within this time, and I am excited to invest the next five years into a career which I find extremely stimulating and enjoyable.

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The structure!! Throughout my projects at University I have tried to challenge myself and do something a little different whilst I have the opportunity to, and I certainly set myself a challenge in terms of the structural design for the Research and Design Centre for Electric Vehicles. It was a difficult process and involved a lot or trial and error but I learnt so much in the development of the design and was happy with the final outcome which made it all worth it.

Sophie Macaulay

Unit Two

2020

  • LinkedIn

What inspired you to create your proposal? 

The projects from Unit 2 were all focused on the Orkney Islands, an archipelago recognised as a global leader within the sustainable energy industry. Since 2003 it is believed that they have generated over 100% of the island’s electricity demand from renewable sources. Our Unit aim was to create a feasible model for communities of the future using Orkney as an exemplar; a model which could be replicated in any rural community. The key objectives looked to encourage economic growth for the island, caring for the elderly population and tackling climate change.

 

In keeping with this I felt that the island would benefit from a Research and Design Centre for Electric Vehicles. This R&D centre looks to generate new job opportunities to attract people to the island, consequently boosting the island's economy and placing Orkney at the forefront of the design of zero emission vehicles. The location in Stromness is remote away from prying eyes, which is perfect for car manufactures as they look to test new vehicles on the onsite test track. 

 

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

My best memories always surround the yearly study trips, although my favourite would have to be when we spent the day cycling around Barcelona in the sunshine visiting all of the architectural landmarks and stopping off once or twice for “uno cerveza por favor”. The study trips were great as they allowed us to look at the very best of international design first hand; from historic treasures to modern structures, often inspiring our future projects in terms of architectural design, structures, construction, environmental design and the history and theory of architectural design.

 

What is your architectural philosophy? 

In light of current events I believe it is important to learn from the economic downturn created by Covid-19 and treat the current pandemic as a catalyst for change within the built environment. It is important that as designers of the built environment we are aware of the opportunities we have to impact mental health and human behaviour in a positive way. Through design we can encourage people to be more active and allow people more control over their own space. 

 

However it is also important that we take the time to address the difficult questions that society faces today and make innovative propositions to tackle these. It is in this way that I believe we must find new solutions to tackle climate change. The built environment currently makes up 40% of the UK’s carbon footprint and this must change. As the next generation of young architects I believe we should be looking to experiment. We need to find an alternative to the top down Victorian construction method currently in use which imposes structure upon matter, and experiment with SynBioDesign or “living architecture”. Although living architecture removes the aesthetic control over the finer details of construction which architects love, I believe it creates a strong proposition for a sustainable future of the built environment, as quoted by Ingber below: 

 

“One can envision a future in which buildings are designed to sense environmental cues and adapt their shape and function to continuously optimize energy efficiency, light transmission, thermal gain, and other behaviours critical for sustainability”  by Donald E Ingber.

 

Why did you choose to study architecture? 

I chose to study architecture as I have always had a passion for creating, be that drawing, painting, sewing, baking - anything which meant I could get a bit messy! However I also really enjoy the mathematical aspects to designing which force you to think outside of the box for solutions. I really love the idea that you can significantly change the happiness of a person’s day to day life through architecture, from proportions, to materials, to room layouts, all of which can have an influence on someone’s mood. It was because of all of these factors combined that I decide to study architecture and 6 years on I am very glad I did.

 

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time? 

In five years’ time I see myself as a successful Architect having achieved my RIBA Part 3 qualification. I will continue to learn new skills that will benefit both the practice I work for and the clients, whilst too helping me achieve my own career goals. I am eager to experience new challenges and visit new countries within this time, and I am excited to invest the next five years into a career which I find extremely stimulating and enjoyable.

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The structure!! Throughout my projects at University I have tried to challenge myself and do something a little different whilst I have the opportunity to, and I certainly set myself a challenge in terms of the structural design for the Research and Design Centre for Electric Vehicles. It was a difficult process and involved a lot or trial and error but I learnt so much in the development of the design and was happy with the final outcome which made it all worth it.

Sophie Macaulay

Unit Two

2020

  • LinkedIn

What inspired you to create your proposal? 

The projects from Unit 2 were all focused on the Orkney Islands, an archipelago recognised as a global leader within the sustainable energy industry. Since 2003 it is believed that they have generated over 100% of the island’s electricity demand from renewable sources. Our Unit aim was to create a feasible model for communities of the future using Orkney as an exemplar; a model which could be replicated in any rural community. The key objectives looked to encourage economic growth for the island, caring for the elderly population and tackling climate change.

 

In keeping with this I felt that the island would benefit from a Research and Design Centre for Electric Vehicles. This R&D centre looks to generate new job opportunities to attract people to the island, consequently boosting the island's economy and placing Orkney at the forefront of the design of zero emission vehicles. The location in Stromness is remote away from prying eyes, which is perfect for car manufactures as they look to test new vehicles on the onsite test track. 

 

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

My best memories always surround the yearly study trips, although my favourite would have to be when we spent the day cycling around Barcelona in the sunshine visiting all of the architectural landmarks and stopping off once or twice for “uno cerveza por favor”. The study trips were great as they allowed us to look at the very best of international design first hand; from historic treasures to modern structures, often inspiring our future projects in terms of architectural design, structures, construction, environmental design and the history and theory of architectural design.

 

What is your architectural philosophy? 

In light of current events I believe it is important to learn from the economic downturn created by Covid-19 and treat the current pandemic as a catalyst for change within the built environment. It is important that as designers of the built environment we are aware of the opportunities we have to impact mental health and human behaviour in a positive way. Through design we can encourage people to be more active and allow people more control over their own space. 

 

However it is also important that we take the time to address the difficult questions that society faces today and make innovative propositions to tackle these. It is in this way that I believe we must find new solutions to tackle climate change. The built environment currently makes up 40% of the UK’s carbon footprint and this must change. As the next generation of young architects I believe we should be looking to experiment. We need to find an alternative to the top down Victorian construction method currently in use which imposes structure upon matter, and experiment with SynBioDesign or “living architecture”. Although living architecture removes the aesthetic control over the finer details of construction which architects love, I believe it creates a strong proposition for a sustainable future of the built environment, as quoted by Ingber below: 

 

“One can envision a future in which buildings are designed to sense environmental cues and adapt their shape and function to continuously optimize energy efficiency, light transmission, thermal gain, and other behaviours critical for sustainability”  by Donald E Ingber.

 

Why did you choose to study architecture? 

I chose to study architecture as I have always had a passion for creating, be that drawing, painting, sewing, baking - anything which meant I could get a bit messy! However I also really enjoy the mathematical aspects to designing which force you to think outside of the box for solutions. I really love the idea that you can significantly change the happiness of a person’s day to day life through architecture, from proportions, to materials, to room layouts, all of which can have an influence on someone’s mood. It was because of all of these factors combined that I decide to study architecture and 6 years on I am very glad I did.

 

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time? 

In five years’ time I see myself as a successful Architect having achieved my RIBA Part 3 qualification. I will continue to learn new skills that will benefit both the practice I work for and the clients, whilst too helping me achieve my own career goals. I am eager to experience new challenges and visit new countries within this time, and I am excited to invest the next five years into a career which I find extremely stimulating and enjoyable.

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The structure!! Throughout my projects at University I have tried to challenge myself and do something a little different whilst I have the opportunity to, and I certainly set myself a challenge in terms of the structural design for the Research and Design Centre for Electric Vehicles. It was a difficult process and involved a lot or trial and error but I learnt so much in the development of the design and was happy with the final outcome which made it all worth it.

Sophie Macaulay

Unit Two

2020

  • LinkedIn