What inspired you to create your proposal?

We were encouraged in our initial research ,to look north beyond Orkneys limits and to see the potential that a changing Arctic environment might hold. Orkneys position as one of the first main ports as you head south from the North West Passage may lead to Orkneys increased involvement in the area. The further I read into the Arctic Circle the more I understood the fragility of the ecosystem and its potential for further exploitation as the area becomes more accessible. 

 

The whole food chain is based on the algae that grows on the underside of the sea ice and should that ice disappear ,all the biodiversity will likely disappear with it. This inspired me to propose an Arctic Laboratory that can not only improve our understanding of the precious ecosystem but also help spread that knowledge to the politicians in the neighbouring Arctic Parliament.

 

What is your best memory of the March course?

Probably making a scale model of Buckminster’s Fullers ,Montreal Biosphere It took weeks of work to figure out how to construct it , and days of 3d printing to get it completed, only for it to be destroyed by my someone I once thought of as a friend. You know who you are….

 

On a more serious note the best memories have been the chance to explore some great places and get to know a great cast of characters, both student and tutor, especially a certain special someone.

 

What is your architectural philosophy?

I would say at the moment my approach is somewhere between environmentalism and modernism, but this is always changing as I continue to read and work. I’m concerned,as I believe we all should be, on the impact our buildings have. Not only o their place but the planet as a whole. I believe we should choose materials and building methods that are renewable as possible ,because we have no reasonable excuse not to. 

 

I’m interested in the how architecture can act as a both a frame for experience -perhaps a view out into a landscape – but also as a canvas for the environment- such as the natural patination that will occur on copper when exposed to the elements. .Director Derek Cianfrance once said that “there is no tricks in the photography , the artifice of the movie making isn’t getting in way the experience ,its allowing for it” .Equally just now I’m striving for an architecture that gets out the way of moments , both human and natural. I guess that is as close as I come to philosophy.


 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

Honestly, I fell into the subject almost accidentally after failing to get into a couple of animation courses, but I was interested in drawing, so I gave it a go. It wasn’t until my year out placement that I really decided that it was the path I wanted to go down.

During that period, I really enjoyed the nitty gritty of the everyday in an architecture office whether that was detail drawings or surveying abandoned buildings. This enjoyment of the work alongside a desire to make places better and build things the right way is what really pushed me to come back and finish my masters.

 

Where do you see yourself in five years?

I will be 29 years old, so probably be dreading turning 30 but maybe Arsenal will have won the league by then, so it’s not all bad.

 

What was the most challenging part of the project?

Definitely the balancing of the project between being an entirely self-driven entity and then having to incorporate the ideas of a variety of different tutors and consultants without losing the initial design intention. An example of this was the service layout of the main laboratory, something I had little experience of, and I found it difficult to discern the correct solution as a variety of options were suggested. 

 

Also having to put trust me in home computer to render images/animations was a nightmare and it’s something I think I will move away from as its limit’s one’s control over an image.

Neil Macalister

Unit Two

2020

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What inspired you to create your proposal?

We were encouraged in our initial research ,to look north beyond Orkneys limits and to see the potential that a changing Arctic environment might hold. Orkneys position as one of the first main ports as you head south from the North West Passage may lead to Orkneys increased involvement in the area. The further I read into the Arctic Circle the more I understood the fragility of the ecosystem and its potential for further exploitation as the area becomes more accessible. 

 

The whole food chain is based on the algae that grows on the underside of the sea ice and should that ice disappear ,all the biodiversity will likely disappear with it. This inspired me to propose an Arctic Laboratory that can not only improve our understanding of the precious ecosystem but also help spread that knowledge to the politicians in the neighbouring Arctic Parliament.

 

What is your best memory of the March course?

Probably making a scale model of Buckminster’s Fullers ,Montreal Biosphere It took weeks of work to figure out how to construct it , and days of 3d printing to get it completed, only for it to be destroyed by my someone I once thought of as a friend. You know who you are….

 

On a more serious note the best memories have been the chance to explore some great places and get to know a great cast of characters, both student and tutor, especially a certain special someone.

 

What is your architectural philosophy?

I would say at the moment my approach is somewhere between environmentalism and modernism, but this is always changing as I continue to read and work. I’m concerned,as I believe we all should be, on the impact our buildings have. Not only o their place but the planet as a whole. I believe we should choose materials and building methods that are renewable as possible ,because we have no reasonable excuse not to. 

 

I’m interested in the how architecture can act as a both a frame for experience -perhaps a view out into a landscape – but also as a canvas for the environment- such as the natural patination that will occur on copper when exposed to the elements. .Director Derek Cianfrance once said that “there is no tricks in the photography , the artifice of the movie making isn’t getting in way the experience ,its allowing for it” .Equally just now I’m striving for an architecture that gets out the way of moments , both human and natural. I guess that is as close as I come to philosophy.


 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

Honestly, I fell into the subject almost accidentally after failing to get into a couple of animation courses, but I was interested in drawing, so I gave it a go. It wasn’t until my year out placement that I really decided that it was the path I wanted to go down.

During that period, I really enjoyed the nitty gritty of the everyday in an architecture office whether that was detail drawings or surveying abandoned buildings. This enjoyment of the work alongside a desire to make places better and build things the right way is what really pushed me to come back and finish my masters.

 

Where do you see yourself in five years?

I will be 29 years old, so probably be dreading turning 30 but maybe Arsenal will have won the league by then, so it’s not all bad.

 

What was the most challenging part of the project?

Definitely the balancing of the project between being an entirely self-driven entity and then having to incorporate the ideas of a variety of different tutors and consultants without losing the initial design intention. An example of this was the service layout of the main laboratory, something I had little experience of, and I found it difficult to discern the correct solution as a variety of options were suggested. 

 

Also having to put trust me in home computer to render images/animations was a nightmare and it’s something I think I will move away from as its limit’s one’s control over an image.

Neil Macalister

Unit Two

2020

  • LinkedIn