Having recently graduated from the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment in Aberdeen, I have successfully gained a Masters degree in Architecture. I have always had an interest in art and enjoyed drawing and crafts from a young age. During my time at Forres Academy I studied graphic communication and art and design, this led me to my interest in studying Architecture. 

 

During my studies I have gained an interested in sustainability and how architecture can make a positive impact on our world going forward, not just making more sustainable buildings but thinking about how we can design places that allow us to live more sustainably. Researching into this briefly when undertaking my dissertation, I looked into what materials could be used to reduce the built environments embodied carbon. 

 

What inspired you to create your proposal?    

Whilst visiting Orkney and developing our masterplan I was always interested in the main town of Kirkwall and how the town could be reimagined and developed to sustain the island as well as provided homes and jobs to allow it to grow. The masterplan aimed to create a design that could be used to showcase how towns in the future could be developed to create opportunities whilst fulfilling the needs for the current residents. My proposal looked at creating a new residential area with affordable housing for all demographics. The site located on the Peedie Sea links the existing town with some of the new developments of the masterplan creating a walkable town. 

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?   

One of the most challenging parts of my project was the geometry of the site and its surroundings. Overlooking the Peedie Sea I wanted to create a design that allowed all of the  homes to look towards this, to do this I used the geometry of the site to determine the shape of the buildings. By doing so this meant the building facades were curved. This made it challenging when thinking about materials and detailing. 

 

What is your best memory of the March course?

Some of the best memories I have about the course are our study trips, they were always an exciting time for the students getting to explore new places and see great architecture. One of my favourite trips was to Barcelona, great weather and some fantastic architecture, experiencing the Sagrada Familia with all my coursemates is a great memory.

Kirst Douglas

Unit Two

2020

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What inspired you to create your proposal?

Although my proposal was driven by a personal interest in, and experience of, craft beer and brewing, a visit to Swannay Brewery in the summer of 2019 confirmed my decision to design an experiential brewery within the context of Stromness.

Only after visiting their expanding facility, meeting with their founder Rob Hill, did I truly get excited about developing my proposal and exploring the design possibilities.

 

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The technical design of my project was the most challenging as it required in-depth understanding of the brewing process and subsequent logistics to ensure the proposal was fully developed inline with the facility’s specific requirements.

Although it was more challenging, the exploration of the Brewery’s technical design was the most rewarding aspect of the project. By developing a comprehensive understanding of brewery operation, the fundamentals of each step in its process, and the conditions under which each takes place, I was able to develop a design which minimised the energy consumption of the facility significantly.

 

The research undertaken and the principles employed within the project have subsequently presented a research opportunity within the university to work alongside local breweries to put the principals into practice. An extremely rewarding outcome to come from a challenging investigation.

 

 

What is your best memory of the M.Arch course?

Undoubtedly, being part of the Fifty-Seven Ten Architecture Society committee (2018/19).

 

We were fortunate enough to welcome an incredible group of architects and artists to the Scott Sutherland School to deliver talks on their work as part of our thirty-year anniversary lecture series.

 

It was incredibly rewarding being part of such a hard working team which put together an impressive run of events. It was a privilege to meet and learn from an extensive range of visiting professionals.

Karla Duncan

Unit Two

2020

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Having recently graduated from the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment in Aberdeen, I have successfully gained a Masters degree in Architecture. I have always had an interest in art and enjoyed drawing and crafts from a young age. During my time at Forres Academy I studied graphic communication and art and design, this led me to my interest in studying Architecture. 

 

During my studies I have gained an interested in sustainability and how architecture can make a positive impact on our world going forward, not just making more sustainable buildings but thinking about how we can design places that allow us to live more sustainably. Researching into this briefly when undertaking my dissertation, I looked into what materials could be used to reduce the built environments embodied carbon. 

 

What inspired you to create your proposal?    

Whilst visiting Orkney and developing our masterplan I was always interested in the main town of Kirkwall and how the town could be reimagined and developed to sustain the island as well as provided homes and jobs to allow it to grow. The masterplan aimed to create a design that could be used to showcase how towns in the future could be developed to create opportunities whilst fulfilling the needs for the current residents. My proposal looked at creating a new residential area with affordable housing for all demographics. The site located on the Peedie Sea links the existing town with some of the new developments of the masterplan creating a walkable town. 

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?   

One of the most challenging parts of my project was the geometry of the site and its surroundings. Overlooking the Peedie Sea I wanted to create a design that allowed all of the  homes to look towards this, to do this I used the geometry of the site to determine the shape of the buildings. By doing so this meant the building facades were curved. This made it challenging when thinking about materials and detailing. 

 

What is your best memory of the March course?

Some of the best memories I have about the course are our study trips, they were always an exciting time for the students getting to explore new places and see great architecture. One of my favourite trips was to Barcelona, great weather and some fantastic architecture, experiencing the Sagrada Familia with all my coursemates is a great memory.

Kirst Douglas

Unit Two

2020

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  • LinkedIn