Growing up I spent a lot of time observing buildings and trying to analyse how the different parts came together, It was a natural interest. At age 12, I decided that one day my design would become the 8th wonder of the world and becoming an architect was the only reasonable way to achieve this. Before learning about prominent architects, seeing several bad buildings with lack of detailing and failure to create any user connection in my country inspired me to do better. 

 

What inspired you to create your proposal?

This background spun a keen interest in how architecture can affect its users and make them feel  a certain way, so I was looking for an opportunity to design a space that could connect people, not just housing or educational buildings but a social space. The visit to Orkney was successful because I observed a gap in the community and social presence in Kirkwall, thus presenting the opportunity to create something for the varying demographic and possibly develop a special interest in elderly care.

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The prime site location I chose came with the price of connecting the old urban fabric with the new. I had to plan for human traffic through the site to access the bridge. The big questions were at what point will this connection be made? Will it be part of the site or on its own? Will it be vehicular or pedestrian only? Etc. In the end it was this one challenge that gave the design architectural character

What is your best memory on the M.Arch course?

I definitely will have good memories from the M.Arch course; from strategic thinking to the inevitable late nights especially the period leading to the third semester studio portfolio review. The studio was open 24hours so it very eventful being there with the usual late-night gang, sleep drained and snacking. The hard work eventually paid off and I loved the output. Above everything, It showed me how much I could achieve when I push myself.

Why did you choose to study architecture?

Growing up I spent a lot of time observing buildings and trying to analyse how the different parts came together, It was a natural interest. At age 12, I decided that one day my design would become the 8th wonder of the world. Becoming an architect was the only reasonable way to achieve this. Before learning about prominent architects, seeing several bad buildings with lack of detailing and failure to create any user connection in my country inspired me to do better.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?

During the M.Arch course, I discovered a connection between my passion for events planning, user experience and architecture that defined my unique career path. In a few years, I see myself as a prominent part of a niche of architects with a passion for events planning and the desire to create memories through carefully planned atmospheres and experiences, one event at a time.

Okwuosa Ifechukwu

Unit Two

2020

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Growing up I spent a lot of time observing buildings and trying to analyse how the different parts came together, It was a natural interest. At age 12, I decided that one day my design would become the 8th wonder of the world and becoming an architect was the only reasonable way to achieve this. Before learning about prominent architects, seeing several bad buildings with lack of detailing and failure to create any user connection in my country inspired me to do better. 

 

What inspired you to create your proposal?

This background spun a keen interest in how architecture can affect its users and make them feel  a certain way, so I was looking for an opportunity to design a space that could connect people, not just housing or educational buildings but a social space. The visit to Orkney was successful because I observed a gap in the community and social presence in Kirkwall, thus presenting the opportunity to create something for the varying demographic and possibly develop a special interest in elderly care.

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The prime site location I chose came with the price of connecting the old urban fabric with the new. I had to plan for human traffic through the site to access the bridge. The big questions were at what point will this connection be made? Will it be part of the site or on its own? Will it be vehicular or pedestrian only? Etc. In the end it was this one challenge that gave the design architectural character

What is your best memory on the M.Arch course?

I definitely will have good memories from the M.Arch course; from strategic thinking to the inevitable late nights especially the period leading to the third semester studio portfolio review. The studio was open 24hours so it very eventful being there with the usual late-night gang, sleep drained and snacking. The hard work eventually paid off and I loved the output. Above everything, It showed me how much I could achieve when I push myself.

Why did you choose to study architecture?

Growing up I spent a lot of time observing buildings and trying to analyse how the different parts came together, It was a natural interest. At age 12, I decided that one day my design would become the 8th wonder of the world. Becoming an architect was the only reasonable way to achieve this. Before learning about prominent architects, seeing several bad buildings with lack of detailing and failure to create any user connection in my country inspired me to do better.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?

During the M.Arch course, I discovered a connection between my passion for events planning, user experience and architecture that defined my unique career path. In a few years, I see myself as a prominent part of a niche of architects with a passion for events planning and the desire to create memories through carefully planned atmospheres and experiences, one event at a time.

Okwuosa Ifechukwu

Unit Two

2020

  • Instagram
  • LinkedIn